Baritone

 
 
  • The title role was well played by baritone, Luis Alejandro Orozco. His was a lanky, lithe barber with a clear strong voice and excellent presence.

    -Abel Searor, Syracuse.com

  • Baritone Luis Orozco’s immaculate sense of comedic timing and facial expressions nearly stole the show in his role as Taddeo, Isabella’s feckless admirer.

    - Daniel Kepl, Casa Magazine

  • Luis Alejandro Orozco was Riolobo, a member of the crew on the ship taking Florencia and several music lovers up the Amazon. Orozco’s charisma and smooth singing introduced the river’s magical world and he told the story with excellent diction.

    -Maria Nockin, Opera Today

  • As Belcore, Luis Alejandro Orozco was a delight, capturing the pompous posturing and opportunistic dealings of his character in a dynamic performance that neatly united the physical and the vocal dimensions.

    -Santa Barbara Independent

  • The Protagonist, Hannah, is played by two singers, a baritone and a mezzo soprano; (here Luis Alejandro Orozco and Ashley Cutright, who physically resemble each other and both sing very well, a notable casting coup).

    -Anne Midgette, The Washington Post

  • Luis Alejandro Orozco sings with exhilarating power and sensitivity. Orozco and Cutright’s physical presences on stage are balletic with grace and stunning in synchronicity.

    -John Stoltenberg, DC Metro Theater Arts

  • (Michigan Opera Theater’s production of Carmen) Baritone Luis Orozco, who, of course, sings the signature “Votre toast, je peux vous le render,” commonly known as “The “Toreador Song,” and lures Carmen to his persona, does a very solid job throughout.

    -David Kiley, Encore Michigan

  • Orozco, a singer with wide experience, brings precision and power to his music. His imposing presence and graceful dance steps complement and enhance the title character without making him only a supporting player. He is the figure Maria must listen to.

    -James MacKillop, Syracuse New Times

  • Baritone Luis Alejandro Orozco, also a veteran of the opera, interprets the archetypal male, El Payador, with impassioned vocals and strong, decisive movement in the tango, asserting his domination in every dance.

    -Linda Loomis

  • Orozco cut a charismatic figure as the lecherous Count Almaviva. His Count swaggered with a touch of cruelty. He projected an imposing presence, both vocally and dramatically, and his facial expressions (one of the benefits of a small theater) were memorable.

    -Janelle Gelfand, Cincinnati Enquirer

  • Orozco conveyed his poetic texts [in Maria de Buenos Aires] with both menace and beauty, cradling the baby tenderly at the end.

    -Mary Ellyn Hutton, ConcertoNet.com

  • Baritone Luis Alejandro Orozco...sang with emotion and added a gentle aura that caught the sadness of Maria's tale.

    -Janelle Gelfand, Cincinnati Enquirer

  • In the part of the Payador, Maria's lover and would-be savior, Luis Alejandro Orozco wields his strong, plangent baritone voice with tender artistry and also cuts a figure of rare physical beauty.

    -Tedrin Blair Lindsay, Contributing Culture Critic, Lexington Herald

  • Luis Alejandro Orozco as the Cantor (In FGO's Production of Maria de Buenos Aires) was magnetic. Orozco's voluminous baritone and beautiful legato suggest a Verdian in the making.

    -Lawrence Budmen, The South Florida Classical Review

  • Orozco's beautiful baritone voice (In FGO's Production of Maria de Buenos Aires) was delightful.

    -Jack Gardner, EDGE Entertainment: Music